(Ellipsis)

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Jenni Evans | Photographer

CREDITS

Production: A Corner in the World X bomontiada ALT
Concept, Text Construction and Direction: Fatih Gençkal
Performers: Onur Berk Arslanoğlu, Nezaket Erden, Ekin Tunçeli, Erkan Uyanıksoy, Fatih Gençkal
Light Design: Utku Kara
Costume Design: Hilal Polat
Sound Design: Eda Er
Production Assistant: Zeynep Ece Taşkın

Duration: 65'

World Premiere: bomontiada ALT, September 2017

Festivals:
A Corner in the World, İstanbul 2018

INFO

(Ellipsis) sets off from Euripides’ tragedy Trojan Women to embark upon a journey into the subconscious landscape of our times. It creates a peculiar yet familiar universe juxtaposing refugee testimonies, astrological texts and contemporary staging conventions with Greek Tragedy situations and texts where ‘off-stage’ elements manipulate the space and the bodies in it. Contemplating on individuals and communities, coincidence and patterns, it depicts humans and their possibilities in a chaotic world, thus creating an anarchy of meaning in a world of Gods and men, of journeys and disasters, war and loss.

PRESS

Olmamış mı?

CREDITS

Conceived and Directed by: Fatih Gençkal
Dramaturgy: Ibrahim HalaçogluPerformers: Murat Mahmutyazıcıoglu, Zinnure Türe, Şafak Ersözlü, Firuze Engin, Hicran Demir, Utku Kara‍
Light Design: Utku Kara
Sound Design: Ozan Tekin, Sinan Tınar
Photos: Mustafa Çankaya, Sertaç Girgin

Duration: 90'

World premiere:  IKSV Salon, Int. Istanbul Theater Festival, May 2012

Festivals: TheaterFormen, Hannover, 2013Festival Premieres, Karlsruhe, 2013Internationale Theaterwerkstatt, Braunschweig, 2012

Performances:
IKSV Salon, garajistanbul, SahneHal, Maçka İTÜ Theater (2012-2013)

INFO

Isn’t it? is a performance dealing with the question of how the world we grow up in shapes our present moment in parallel with how the interdisciplinary creation works.  Bringing together a company of artists from disciplines as diverse as theater, music, design, literature and film, this devised performance deals with the present moment through the cultural images of our childhood: the troublesome years of change and conflict in Turkish society, the 1990s.  The ingredients of this collage are personal anecdotes, objects, sounds, scents that reveal our private links to the cultural images of the 90s, gestures and speeches of the cultural icons of the 90s. Exhilarating episodes of 90s visuality –dances, competitions, songs- threaded together with video episodes of personal anecdotes revealing the complex dilemmas of the young artist of today.

PRESS

BBC World Service, StrandFrance 2AnsaMed, ItalySalom newspaperMilliyet Sanat magazineGrizine website interviewBir+Bir magazineLeCool IstanbulHurriyet Daily News

Olmamış mı? Rehearsal Log

What do i do?

CREDITS

Conceived by: Fatih Gençkal
Performed by: Fatih Gençkal, Zinnure Türe, Şafak Ersözlü

World premiere:  Arada Festival May 2011

Festivals: Arada Festival İstanbul-Vienna 2011Young Choreographs 2011
Internationale Theaterwerkstatt, Braunschweig, 2012

INFO

What do i do? investigates the idea of 'open improvisation'.

A group of people gather in a room.
A try on living the present moment together.
The body and  the soul.
The view-er and the perform-er.
Not one, and not two.

Beyond Successive Exiles... The Wind Take Us Home

CREDITS

Written by: Mohammad Al Attar
Directed by: Fatih Gençkal
Performed by: Jawad Al Habbel, Fatih Gençkal

With the Support of Mophradat and Yücel Kültür Vakfı

World premiere: Abud Efendi Konağı, A Corner in the World Festival, October 2016

INFO

This is an essay Syrian playwright Mohammad Al Attar wrote. It is a meditation and a performative delivery of the text by 2 performers: Turkish and Syrian.

‘A Syrian friend tells me that he has become liberated from the restricting idea of homeland. He wants to roam the world, he became tired with being captive to a desired homeland that will never be. I heard different variations on this sentence from other Syrian friends here in Berlin. No doubt, it takes courage to believe so, but they all avoided looking into my eyes while talking about being liberated from the idea of homeland and the illusions of alienation and exile.’

Fatih Gençkal